GPG signed commits in PHPStorm on CentOS 7

Having the functionality of automatically being prompted to sign your commits while still using PHPStorms Git GUI means you’ll never forget to sign commits again.

To start with, the version of Git installed needs to be > 2.0, otherwise certain options we are using will not work.

On CentOS 7 you’ll need to either build from source, or use a 3rd-party repository such as the IUS Community Project in order to do that. I prefer using repositories over building from source, as it’s easier to update the packages later on.

To use the 3rd-party repository method run the following:

yum install epel-release
yum remove git
rpm -U https://centos7.iuscommunity.org/ius-release.rpm
yum install git2u

Next, if you don’t have a GPG key yet, you’re going to need to generate one, GitHub have a nice guide on this already.

Next we need to add some options to our git config, I’ve went with adding to my global configuration here, however you can set this on a project by project basis by just omitting the --global tag.

git config --global commit.gpgsign true
git config --global user.signingkey ENTER_YOUR_KEY

If you’re confused on how to get your signing key for above, again Github have a guide on that.

At this point, running git commit -S -m "Example commit" will prompt you to enter the password for your secret key.

The last part is to add the following configuration to ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf

no-tty

Now when you make a commit in PHPStorm, you’ll be prompted for the password for your secret key, and the commit will be signed.


Posted on January 23, 2019

DevOps at Kobas

I’ve been at Kobas two years now, I previously wrote about my experiences in my first month , so it seemed fitting to do an overview of my experiences since then surrounding the software we use for DevOps.

Jenkins & Continuous Delivery

Jenkins Image At Kobas we use continuous delivery rather than continuous deployment, tool of choice; old man Jenkins .

Jenkins, although riddled with UI/UX issues, is a very helpful tool for us day to day now. We have all sorts of pipelines setup for deploying to our EPoS & Cloud servers. Having the ‘one click’ ability to release to a QA or Production environment and letting Jenkins handle all the steps that go on throughout that build process is a time-saver.

Having the ability to rollback to a previous git tag when a bug has been introduced proves to be a real lifesaver. I can’t imagine going back to releasing projects via script or knowledge.

We keep our Jenkins configuration backed up in Git as the thought of losing all the work put into Jenkins and having to start again is nightmare inducing.

Codeception & Jenkins

My latest win, and one that took the longest to achieve was having Codeception and Jenkins play nicely together for automated testing.

The initial part of that went fine, just getting Codeception to run automatically via the Jenkins build process. But then I decided I wanted metrics like code coverage, the ability to run acceptance tests via Selenium & being able to reset our testing database before each test runs.

Selenium is something I’ve played with a lot on my own machine, so setting up Selenium Grid on a server didn’t cause me much trouble.

Code coverage however has been a pain. Needing c3.php to get remote code coverage working required a number of disgusting hacks / workarounds. This was due to the way our project is setup, the main directory Codeception is in, isn’t even synced to our servers.

The results where worth the pain though I now have the ability of viewing a breakdown of code coverage like this:

Code coverage report

(clearly not an image from our Jenkins, imagine a lot more red).

You also get a dashboard for coverage distribution and showing you the files with the most CRAP (change risk anti-patterns), my new favourite acronym. I can’t seem to find an example of that view online however.

Perhaps later I’ll do a blog post on how to set this up on an open source project and will link to it from here. (Making plans for 2020 already)

Puppet & Server Config

Controlling configuration manually might seem okay when you only have a handful of servers, I certainly manage my personal servers manually still.

At Kobas we have two types of servers, our ‘Cloud’ servers (hosted by AWS) and our ‘EPoS’ servers (hosted by our clients on-site). Currently, we have 4-5 AWS servers, and 170+ EPoS servers. Managing configuration change across the EPoS servers would be impossible without Puppet.

Puppet isn’t the only tool that handles configuration management, there are a number of tools to choose between; Chef and Ansible are two that come to mind. I’ve only used Puppet so can’t comment on the advantages of one over the other. I do recommend getting at least one of these tools setup to manage your server configuration though as the pay-off is huge.

Using a configuration management tool ensures that all your configuration is the same across every environment; development, qa and production. Significantly reducing the ‘But it works on my machine’ issue. It also requires you to put additional thought into making configuration changes.


Posted on September 23, 2018

Helpful Linux commands

So this is just going to be a bit of knowledge dump of things I’ve picked up lately / don’t want to forget.

Bang Cash !$

If you are intending on running a few commands with the last argument of the command being the same this can be really helpful. For example:

ping 127.0.0.1
netmap !$
traceroute !$

Alternatively you can also do !* to use all the arguments of the previous command.

sudo !!

This one is pretty simple sudo !! takes the last command and re-runs with sudo.

Screen

screen is a great feature that allows you to do any of the following; – Use multiple shells in a single SSH session. – Run a long running process without maintaining an active shell or worrying about network disruptions. – Disconnect and re-connect to a shell from multiple locations.

Using it is very simple, to start it you just use the command screen, from this point you are now inside of a window within screen.

Using screen requires remembering a few more commands (or noting them down in a blog post or something).

Start screen:

screen

To start a screen with a name, you can do the following screen -S 'name'

Create another window:

Ctrl-a c

Next window:

Ctrl-a n

Previous window:

Ctrl-a p

Detach window:

Ctrl-a d

This will detach your window and return you to your bash shell.

Re-attach screen:

screen -r If you have multiple screens, this will display a list of them and you will have to use the name of the screen as a third parameter to reattach to it.

Searching through previous commands

So as you may know you can use Control + R on Linux to search through previous commands you’ve entered in the terminal. You can with a few modifications of your ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile improve what is stored in the ~/.bash_history file, making this feature even more useful for remembering previous commands.

Ignore certain commands:

HISTIGNORE="pwd:df:du:cd:ls"

Increase how many commands are stored:

HISTFILESIZE=10000 (the default on most systems is 500)

Don’t save duplicate commands:

HISTCONTROL=ignoredups


Posted on January 14, 2018

Bash/Cygwin Terminal in PHPStorm

I’ve been meaning to post about this for a while, but it seems hard lately to make time to post here.

I personally hate windows shell, in my mind it is utterly useless. If I’m ever using it I’m probably not in a good mood. Powershell makes me laugh, like I’m sure it has some uses for people who for some insane reason run Windows servers, but for a sane developer; I think not.

Bash is where it’s at, probably the tool/language that saves me the most time on a day to day basis. Regex is a close second and guess what, Regex & Bash play very nicely together. Luckily I work with a company that exclusively uses Linux servers, because they make good decisions like that. So any server admin is painless, however for development, I still seem to be stuck in Windows land. I could make the leap over to just using Linux, however there are unfortunately a handful of programs keeping me on Windows and WINE still sucks.

So Bash on Windows, only one way to do that really. Cygwin . I’m not going to go into how to install that here, because it’s very simple, just download, run and press next.

Jetbrains make amazing products, PHPStorm is the editor I spend most of my time in, so I’ve shown how to do this here. However it should work for any Jetbrains IDE since they are all pretty consistent.

I liked the idea of a terminal window inside the IDE, mainly as just a quick way to grep or find things within projects. So I decided to figure out how to replace the windows terminal embedded in it with the cygwin terminal.

So it turns out it’s pretty simple, just go File -> Settings and hit Tools -> Terminal. You’ll want to change it’s default from cmd.exe to "C:\path_you_installed_cywin_to\bin\bash.exe" --login -i

Here is an image of what I have: phpstorm.png

After this, when you relaunch your terminal inside PHPStorm it will be the Cygwin terminal rather than the Windows terminal. However there is just one issue left to deal with, it will default to your Cygwin home directory rather than the project directory. Fixing this is also pretty easy just navigate to C:\path_you_installed_cywin_to\etc\bash.bashrc at the bottom of that file just add

cd "$OLDPWD"

Here is another image for those still confused:

script.png

Well that’s it, enjoy Bash’ing away inside PHPStorm.


Posted on March 14, 2017

Making a simple RTS game – Week Three

So week two of making an RTS was September 2nd – 9th. Almost three months later I’ve managed to spend most of my weekend on it. This is pretty typical timeline of any of my personal side-project’s. sigh

So I started on Friday after having a burger and beer at the ingeniously named Burger and Beer doing some work on graphics. Even though I haven’t put any work into the game I had been thinking about how to make things easier since I’ve decided to make an RTS game as my first game while learning PhaserJS. Not exactly the easiest idea to go for, snake or space invaders would have been much easier.

So I decided to ditch my idea of having actual units that would require a lot of animation and switch to a space theme as spaceships seem easier overall to animate. I bought ” Space Shooter Creation Kit” from Gameart2d.com which was only $13.50 USD so pretty reasonable cost for a hobby project.

To begin with I really only need two sprites, one for a “fighter” and one for a “worker” so the following two seem to do the trick for now:

Attacker Unit Worker Unit

After that I decided to redo my tile map to match the space ships, I decided to just look for an image with a free to use license of space because how hard can that be, but space seems to be pretty low quality when zoomed in so I did end up having to do some editing of what I ended up finding. The result of that was this:

Map

After implementing the new images in Phaser that was pretty much my Friday.

Saturday and Sunday (today) was spent trying to get units to move based on cursor movement, overall an hilarious experience. I spent a lot of time laughing at the worker unit going out of control when I had bugs in movement and/or physics code.

Saturday I was attempting to actually get the functionality required, which is using the selection box to select units and then clicking a location to move those units to that location. However trying to do all of that at once was proving to be very confusing so I decided to first figure out how to get the sprite to move to the location clicked by the cursor. That worked easily enough as there are some in-built PhaserJS functions for that functionality, however since I don’t really intend on that being the functionality I ended up having to write some of my own functions so that when I have the selection group working the movement will work with it also. Doing that took most of Saturday and Sunday, my next challenge is getting the sprite to rotate to the moved location.

Lastly I realised I can host the whole thing on Github Pages since I have the code up in my github repository so throughout development this url will always be the master version of where I am at.

I’m hoping there won’t be as big of a gap between week 3 -> week 4, however next week is already looking pretty hectic so it is going to be delayed.


Posted on November 27, 2016